Humanities in the Regions

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The Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres (ACHRC) is the peak representative body for Humanities research centres and institutes in Australia and New Zealand. In 2015, the ACHRC established a group dedicated to promoting Humanities-based research in regional areas of Australia, and to cascading peak body, state-of-play knowledge throughout regional institutions. The aim is to build research capacity, connectivity and institutional knowledge for Humanities research. One of our most successful member initiatives is “Humanities in the Region,” which acknowledges that research in the humanities is different in regional universities than it is in Group of 8 universities.

 

Humanities in the Regions Events

 

2020 Humanities in the Regions: Call for Papers

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The Two Cultures: Confrontation and Collaboration
The Arts and the Sciences in Dangerous Times

A virtual conference: 9am – 1pm, 3 July 2020

REVISED DEADLINE: 7th June 2020

Confirmed Keynotes:
  • Dr. Paul Hardisty (Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Institute of Marine Science)
  • Dr. Margaret Cook (University of the Sunshine Coast)

With HDR/ECR professional development workshops from Dr. Margaret Cook and Dr. Elizabeth Tynan, in coordination with ASAL 2020.

Call for Papers

‘I believe the intellectual life of the whole of western society is increasingly being split into two polar groups. . . . Literary intellectuals at one pole—at the other scientists, and as the most representative, the physical scientists. Between the two a gulf of mutual incomprehension—sometimes hostility and dislike, but most of all lack of understanding. They have a curious distorted image of each other.’

However much a product of its historical moment, C.P. Snow’s provocative analysis of two cultures in his 1959 Rede lecture still stands as a challenge to more effective collaboration between the humanities and the sciences and to a more nuanced, better integrated understanding of humanity and its role in the universe. This one-day symposium on Humanities in the Regions, to be held virtually, has been organised by the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres (ACHRC) and James Cook University (JCU) to interrogate the common assumption that there are two broad, competitive cultures operating within our universities and our society, competing for students, competing for recognition, competing for funding, and competing for the right to ‘science’ (knowledge) itself.

This is especially important today. Jeremy Rifkin’s 2011 bestseller The Third Industrial Revolution: How Lateral Power is Transforming Energy, the Economy, and the World predicted that the world is on the cusp of unprecedented change. According to Rifkin and others, we are currently undergoing a third industrial revolution, requiring innovative thinking, problem solving and solutions on a scale not just equal to, but exceeding, the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century. In 2020, we are witnessing immense economic and humanitarian disruption as a result of bushfires and the COVID-19 pandemic, which have already forced society to adapt to new and unfavourable economic conditions. Identifying and normalising alternative models of research, education, communication, and community in a post-pandemic world will be imperative for researchers everywhere – but especially for researchers in regional locations already experiencing the tyranny of distance.

In this symposium, scholars are invited to address the question of the similarities and differences between the sciences and the humanities, especially as they pertain to regional universities, and to tell us how the two sets of disciplines might relate better to each other, what they could learn from each other, and how they might be reconciled in a more balanced model of education. How can the arts and humanities collaborate with the sciences to address these wicked problems, and what could (or should) the regional humanities look like in the future?

Suggested topics may include:

  • STEAM (Arts Plus STEM) in education and research, broadly conceived
  • The role of arts and humanities in addressing COVID-19, for example:
    • Medical humanities approaches;
    • Community-building in a post-pandemic era;
    • Humanities or STEAM-based approaches to legal and moral issues such as surveillance or population management techniques.
  • The role of the arts and humanities in addressing environmental crises, e.g. climate change, bushfires, coral bleaching, protecting the Great Barrier Reef, environmental degradation, and the Anthropocene.
  • The importance of creative collaborations and innovative thinking to address problems such as the UN Development Goals of CO2 emissions, financial inclusion, gender equity, and closing the gap – focusing on Indigenous inequities and the Global South more broadly
  • STEAM in development studies and projects
  • STEAM approaches to stimulating sustainable industries (e.g. eco-tourism, agriculture, mining and fisheries)
  • STEAM and the future of education (at the academic or school level)
  • STEAM and the future of work
  • Practices, potentials, pitfalls, and partnerships between industry and academia
  • STEAM and regional capacity
  • Declining enrolments in the humanities in the regions: is STEAM a solution, or smoke-and-mirrors?
  • Blue and green environmental humanities, or medical humanities, particularly with a regional focus
  • Applied (‘real life problem’) versus blue sky (discipline-driven) approaches to research in the humanities: complementary or competitive approaches?
  • The role of arts, social sciences, and humanities in science communication

The live component of this symposium will be hosted through Zoom from 9am-1:30pm on 3 July 2020. Alongside the live session, we will release a variety of artefacts and papers which can be viewed asynchronously. Unfortunately, our time in the live seminar is limited, and so we are only accepting proposals for asynchronous contributions.

We welcome submissions for innovative formats or creative pieces suitable for asynchronous online delivery, including but not limited to:

  • Lightning papers (3 min, pre-recorded)
  • Digital poster + Discussion (3 min, pre-recorded or written)
  • Short written paper, published on blog
  • Podcast (20min)
  • Creative objects (art, fiction, short film, etc.) + exegesis (3 min, pre-recorded or written)

Please submit a 300 word proposal/abstract and 100 word bio to info@achrc.net by 7 June 2020. Please also specify the asynchronous format you have chosen.
Final artefacts to be submitted by 5pm June 25 2020.

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2019 Humanities in the Regions event

 

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ACHRC Humanities in the Regions 2019

The University of Newcastle Thursday 30 May & Friday 31st May 2019

with an optional cultural tour on Saturday 1 June

(image: The Coal River or Port of Newcastle New South Wales, attributed to John William Lewin 1808)

Register for the event (free) using Eventbrite here.

The event program is available for download here

 

More information is available here: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/newsroom/faculty-of-education-and-arts/humanities-in-the-region-symposium

In late May 2019, the School of Humanities and Social Science and the Centre for 21st Century Humanities will be hosting the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres’ Humanities in the Regions symposium with the theme of “Renewal”.

Held each year in a regional centre, the gathering provides an opportunity to share knowledge around the practicalities of conducting humanities research from a regional location.  Planned sessions featuring local and national experts will focus on grant writing for ARC and Categories 2 – 4 funding; establishing and maintaining research relationships with industry, in particular with GLAM; research collaborations between Humanities and Creative Arts; and using how teaching and research can be mutually supporting.

 

 

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balfourstlauncestonACHRC Humanities in the Regions 2018

10 – 11 May 2018, Launceston

Co-hosted by the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres

and the Centre for Colonalism and its Aftermath, University of Tasmania

 

The 2018 two-day collaboratory explores the nexus of humanities research partnerships between academics, cultural institutions, and industry.

Through a keynote papers, discussion, and showcase panels, the two days of event will engage with key issues in our research practice:

  • How do researchers in the Humanities build meaningful connections beyond their regional setting?
  • How do we build partnerships to demonstrate and accentuate our impact within our regions?
  • How do we develop strategies to maximise and communicate the benefits of our unique research environments when applying for grants?
  • How do we build better ways of engaging and respecting Indigenous communities in research?

Over two days, participants will hear keynote addresses from leading researchers followed by panel discussions from a range of stakeholders, before engaging in workshops on the same topic with peers. The workshops will give opportunities to discuss ideas with experts and to reflect on how best practice can be applied at home institutions.

The event will stimulate debate on future trajectories for research, will build cross-institutional connections and research synergies, and will enable strategies for funding success.

Download the program here

Register here

We hope to see you in Launceston in May!

 

 

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2017 event:

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2017 Conference: “Impact, Engagement and Connectivity”
18-19 May 2017
University of New England, Armidale

This two-day event combines presentations on practical aspects of working on Humanities-projects from the regions, expertise in collaboration and grant writing partnerships, and workshops aimed at generating research outcomes. Register here

Participants will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from a range of peak body organisations, and to learn strategies for building strong research connections across universities and cultural institutions at both local and international levels. A range of workshops have also been designed to collaboratively explore key issues in our research practice:

  • How do researchers in the Humanities build meaningful connections beyond their regional setting?
  • How do we build partnerships to demonstrate and accentuate our impact within our regions?
  • How do we develop strategies to maximise and communicate the benefits of our unique research environments when applying for grants?

Over two days, participants will hear keynote addresses from leading researchers and be invited to participate in panel discussions, as well as engage in workshops on key topics with peers. The workshops will give opportunities to discuss ideas with expert mentors and to reflect on how best practice can be applied at home institutions. Co-hosted by The School of Humanities, University of New England, and the ACHRC, the event will stimulate debate on future trajectories for research, will build cross-institutional connections and research synergies, and will enable strategies for funding success.

Keynotes:
Professor Melanie Oppenheimer (Flinders University, ARC College of Experts)
Professor Keir Reeves (Federation University)

The event is free but registration is essential. Register here.

For more information contact Dr Tully Barnett, Associate Director, ACHRC: info@achrc.net.au

Draft program:

DAY 1: Thursday, 18 May 2017
9.00-9.30 Welcome to Country – Elders of the Kamillaroi & Anaiwan peoples.

Opening Remarks –  A/Prof. Richard Scully, Chair of Research, School of Humanities (University of New England)

The ACHRC and ‘Humanities in the Regions’ – Revisiting the Organising Principles of the initiative

• A/Prof. Robert Phiddian (Flinders University) Director, ACHRC

• Dr Jane Mummery (Federation University) & A/Prof. Lisa Chandler (University of the Sunshine Coast), Co-chairs of the Humanities in the Regions.

9.30-11.00 SESSION 1: Indigenous Research and Researchers

 • Dr Lorina Barker (University of New England)

• Arts Creative Practice HDRs (University of New England)

• Dr Mark Moore (University of New England)

11.00-11.30 MORNING TEA
11.30 -1.00 SESSION 2: Value, Culture and Regional Organisations
• Mr Robert Heather (Director, NERAM)

• A/Prof. Lisa Chandler (University of the Sunshine Coast)

• Dr Tully Barnett (Flinders University)

Followed by discussion

1.00-2.00 LUNCH
2.00-3.30 SESSION 3: ARCs and Grant Writing for DECRA, Discovery, Linkage and Fellowships
Keynote Speaker:

• Professor Melanie Oppenheimer (Flinders University)

Responding Panel:

• Fiona Utley, Libby Magann (University of New England Research Services)

3.30-4.00 AFTERNOON TEA
4.00-5.00 SESSION 4: Workshop: ARC, ERA, Research Environment

Mentors:

• Professor Anne Pender (University of New England);

• Professor Melanie Oppenheimer (Flinders University)

Activity:

  • Break into small groups to write a research environment statement OR think through some of the key challenges you have had in writing a research environment statement
  • Small groups report back to the large group.
5.00-6.00 Drinks and Nibbles
7.30-late DINNER – Red Grapevine

 

 DAY 2: Friday, 19 May 2017
9.30-10.30 SESSION 1:   School of Humanities Research Seminar:
• Emeritus Professor Graham Maddox (University of New England)

Republicanism in the Interregnum

10.30-11.00 MORNING TEA
11.00-12.00 SESSION 2: Humanities Research and Research Funding – Challenges and Opportunities
• Professor Heiko Daniel (University of New England) Pro-Vice Chancellor, Research
12.00-12.45 LUNCH
12.45-2.00 SESSION 3: Research and Engagement Strategies for Regionally-Based Humanities Research Centres.
Keynote Speaker: Professor Keir Reeves (Federation University)

Responding Panel:

• Professor Howard Brasted (Asia-Pacific, University of New England)

• A/Prof. David Roberts (Heritage Futures, University of New England)

 

2.00-2.30 AFTERNOON TEA
2.30-4.00 SESSION 4: Research and Collecting Institutions
• Dr Bronwyn Hopwood & UNEMA (University of New England)

• Dr Robert Clarke, (University of Tasmania)

• Dr Marty Branagan & Peace Collection, Dixson (University of New England)

• Dr Rachel Franks, (State Library of New South Wales)

 

From 4.00 SESSION 5: Closing Remarks & Thanks accompanied by Drinks and nibbles
A/Prof. Richard Scully (UNE)

• Planning the next steps for the initiative

‘Humanities in the Regions’… 2018 and beyond….

LAST FLIGHT – QANTASLINK: 5.10pm  (Armidale to Sydney)

LAST FLIGHT – REX: 5.35pm  (Armidale to Sydney)

Register for the 2017 Humanities in the Regions event here

 

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Previous ACHRC Humanities in the Regions Events

Humanities in the Regions 2016

University of Wollongong

28-29 September 2016

Co-hosted by the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres and the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts, University of Wollongong

The event was presented with the support of Council for Humanities Arts Social Sciences,  Regional Universities Network,   Federation University Australia, and the University of Wollongong.

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Humanities in the Regions 2015

“Building Capacity Through Connectivity and Knowledge”

University of Southern Queensland

13-14 April 2015

Co-hosted by the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres and the University of Southern Queensland‘s Toowoomba campus

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Co-chairs of the initiative:
Dr Jane Mummery, Federation University Australia (Ballarat Campus); and
Dr Lisa Chandler, University of Southern Queensland.

For more information or to become involved contact Tully Barnett

 

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